Accountable Care Organization, Healthcare Big Data, Healthcare Portal, and ACO Implementation Resources Accountable Care Organization, Healthcare Big Data, Healthcare Portal, and ACO Implementation Resources

FEATURED ARTICLES: ACO

  • Raising The Stakes In Telehealth
    Raising The Stakes In Telehealth

    The University of Kentucky and the Kentucky TeleHealth Network are pushing the envelope of telemedicine, driving reimbursement policy and expanding care. By Vicki Amendola, Editor, Health IT Outcomes

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CASE STUDIES & WHITE PAPERS

  • Leveraging Big Data And Analytics In Healthcare

    With the cost of mapping an individual human genome poised to break the $1,000 barrier – bringing personalized medicine closer to reality – the healthcare and life sciences industries are now grappling with managing the explosive growth of data.

  • Cost Fears Not Slowing Wireless Growth In Healthcare

    As healthcare organizations develop strategies to comply with federal mandates and succeed in the new environment, wireless is one of the emerging technologies that can enable organizations to meet their clinical and business objectives, especially in this era of having to do more with a finite set of resources.

  • White Paper: Healthcare Business Insights: Social Media Strategy For Healthcare Vendors This white paper outlines how vendors in the healthcare space are using social networking sites to take relationship building to the next level, resulting in increased qualified leads, and, ultimately, a greater return on marketing investment. By Jennifer Dennard
  • Accountable Care Trends, Strategies, And Best Practices

    Movement within the nation’s healthcare system has been swift and broad-­‐based since the October 2011 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Shared Savings Final Rule.

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FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK

  • The Problem With Consumerism In Healthcare
    The Problem With Consumerism In Healthcare

    Many industry leaders championed a free market approach to healthcare during the 12th Annual World Health Care Congress last week. Here are a few key reasons why I don’t think this model is “the fix” our industry so desperately needs.

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ACO PREMIUM CONTENT

  • A Road Map To Accelerating  Health IT Value And Innovation
    A Road Map To Accelerating Health IT Value And Innovation

    Health IT is in a state of constant evolution, and it often seems that, for every problem solved, another is created. That’s why it’s vital we stop to assess where the industry stands from time to time, as well as look to the future to determine the best course to take to achieve our collective goals.

  • Medical Moneyball — What Healthcare Stands To Learn From The Oakland A’s
    Medical Moneyball — What Healthcare Stands To Learn From The Oakland A’s

    With all the talk of Big Data, there are still big questions as to how to most effectively leverage information and data to make a positive impact on healthcare delivery, cost, and outcomes. One health system leader thinks an approach developed by a Major League baseball team might be a game changer.

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ABOUT ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATIONS (ACO)

An Accountable Care Organization (ACO) utilizes a payment and care delivery system that bases payments to providers on quality metrics and seeks to reduce the total cost of care for a certain population of patients.  ACOs use a range of payment models and consist of groups of coordinated healthcare providers that provide care to groups of patients. ACOs are accountable to a third-party payer and the group of patients for the appropriateness, quality, and efficiency of the health services they provide.

In 2011, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) set forth initial guidelines for ACOs to be created under the Medicare Shared Savings Program. These guidelines contained all necessary steps required for a physician, health care provider, or hospital to voluntarily participate in ACOs.

The quality measures used to evaluate an ACO's performance as defined by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) fall into five domains. These domains are patient/caregiver experience, care coordination, patient safety, preventative health, and at-risk population/frail elderly health.

The three stakeholders in an ACO are the providers, payers, and patients. Providers are a network of hospitals, physicians, and other healthcare professionals. The primary payer is the federal government, Medicare, but also includes other payers such as private insurances or employee-purchased insurance. The patient population of an ACO will primarily consist of Medicare beneficiaries, but in larger ACOs can also include those who are homeless and uninsured.