EHR, EMR, Electronic Records, Hospital Records, Medical Record Keeping, and HIPAA Health Record Compliance Resources EHR, EMR, Electronic Records, Hospital Records, Medical Record Keeping, and HIPAA Health Record Compliance Resources

FEATURED ARTICLES: EMR/EHR

  • Closing Gaps In Care With Digital Care Coordination
    Closing Gaps In Care With Digital Care Coordination

    The rates for closing gaps in care are some of the most widely used, quantitative metrics to measure quality, allocate incentives, and control costs. Both health plans and providers are each financially incentivized to close gaps in care. For health plans, programs through Medicaid (HEDIS) and Medicare (STARS) have meaningful incentives and/or penalties tied to a members’ ability to receive certain healthcare services. Similarly, valued-based providers can control costs by providing certain recurring services to their patients. Fee for service providers also benefit from the additional volume generated by closing gaps in care. Gap closure uniquely aligns quality and financial incentives across health plans and providers.

  • Patient Matching: Challenge Accepted

    Patient misidentification in healthcare is costly to the system and puts patient safety at risk. Records linking and identifier solutions tackle this complicated problem with remarkable results.

  • The Self-Servicing Of Healthcare: Progress Or Patient Abandonment?

    For most people, it’s difficult to remember when automated teller machines (ATMs) did not exist. Prior to the introduction of ATMs, every banking task required filling out a short form, waiting in line to interact with a teller and maybe even waiting for that teller to speak with a manager to sign off on your transaction. Of course, all of this assumed that you could even get to the bank in between the tight business hours that it kept.

  • Why ACOs Need More From HIT

    As Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) take on more risk under the new Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), they must provide quality care while generating cost savings. This challenge is especially pronounced within the fast-growing senior population, the group most likely to experience a serious or advanced illness and who often need extensive healthcare services.

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EHR CASE STUDIES & EHR WHITE PAPERS

More EHR Case Studies & EHR White Papers

ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS

Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems, also called electronic medical records (EMRs), are designed to collect and store information about individual patients or populations digitally. Conceptually, the electronic aspect allow then to be shared across healthcare providers, departments, and locations. EHRs and EMRs provide an advantage over paper records by making patient data available instantly in any location and allowing data to be stored and retrieved more efficiently.

EHRs and EMRs can store information, images, scans, and more to provide physicians with a comprehensive view of a patient's medical history, current medications, allergies, immunizations, test and lab results, previous diagnoses, and other relevant information.

In addition to providing patient information, EHRs and EMRs allow providers to better automate and streamline the collection and organization of patient data. Electronic access to patient information allows healthcare organizations to make better decisions, spot trends and outbreaks, manage care quality, and report on outcomes.

EHRs and EMRs can also reduce redundancy and duplicate work, reducing staffing costs and freeing up personnel to spend more time with patients and less time with paperwork. This solution center is here to help you in your EHR research and to help you find the best EHR solution for your organization.