ABOUT HEALTH LANGUAGE

Health Language provides software, content, and consulting solutions that map, translate, update, and manage standard and enhanced clinical terminologies on an enterprise scale — enabling the information liquidity required to support healthcare’s toughest challenges, such as meaningful use, ICD-10, population health, analytics, ACOs, and semantic interoperability among systems. Our global team of developers, clinical professionals, terminology domain experts, and other healthcare information technology specialists have built an enterprise clinical terminology management platform to support these market challenges.

Our solutions are used to 1) ensure enterprise compliance with terminology standards, 2) harmonize data from disparate terminologies into standard terminologies, 3) abstract complex terminologies from end users, and 4) mitigate the financial risks inherent to the ICD-10 transition.

FEATURED CONTENT

  •  NLP: Unlocking The Potential Of Unstructured Text In Healthcare
    NLP: Unlocking The Potential Of Unstructured Text In Healthcare

    Hospitals and health systems are sitting on a wealth of patient information that has potential to transform care delivery. Yet analytics infrastructures designed to fuel performance improvement have traditionally overlooked much of that data because it resides in health IT systems as unstructured free text.

  • Provider Friendly Terminology: A Better Problem List Strategy
    Provider Friendly Terminology: A Better Problem List Strategy

    Problem lists are not new to healthcare, yet the industry has historically struggled to accurately capture this critical snapshot of patient problems and visit diagnoses. While EHRs now provide an efficient way to gather problem list data, they don’t address the underlying challenge of clean data capture due to the wide variance in terminologies used across the industry.

  • Hierarchical Condition Categories Part 1: What’s All The Buzz About?
    Hierarchical Condition Categories Part 1: What’s All The Buzz About?

    There is quite a bit of discussion around Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs) these days. And for good reason: as the risk adjustment model used since 2004 to determine reimbursement for various Medicare plans, the HCC framework is progressively being applied to numerous healthcare reform initiatives. In this two-part series, we break down the basics of HCCs, why they matter and how all healthcare stakeholders should respond to them going forward.

  • Health Language And MediMobile Partner To Improve The Hospital Revenue Cycle
    Health Language And MediMobile Partner To Improve The Hospital Revenue Cycle

    It’s no secret that reimbursement is increasingly complex for today’s hospitals and health systems. In truth, a fair amount of billing inaccuracies and missed charge capture has always been part of the bottom-line challenge. But today’s providers simply cannot afford to let any money slip through the cracks as they navigate new value-based care models and take on more risk.

  • Why The Time Is Right For Reference Data Management
    Why The Time Is Right For Reference Data Management

    The management and use of the growing volume of clinical and claims data to navigate evolving regulatory initiatives such as the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and the 21st Century Cures Act is leading many healthcare organizations to turn to reference data management (RDM).

  • Overcoming The Complexity Of Customizable Data
    Overcoming The Complexity Of Customizable Data

    EMR and other healthcare software applications must maintain dropdown lists of codes, which are regularly updated by the standard bodies. As a software vendor you need to ensure that you are monitoring for updates, analyzing each update to determine what actually changed, and then incorporating the updates and shipping updated code to all of your customers. In this blog, I discuss the challenge of managing codes and dropdown lists on your own, as opposed to using a terminology management solution to manage these frequent updates for you.

  • Release Of 2017 ISA Is Good News For Interoperability
    Release Of 2017 ISA Is Good News For Interoperability

    The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) recently released the 2017 Interoperability Standards Advisory (ISA), an update to the 2016 version that holds great promise for advancing health information exchange. National Coordinator Vindell Washington hailed the release as “a key step toward achieving the goals” outlined in the Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap and Interoperability Pledge announced earlier this year.

  • New Measures Increase Focus On Semantic Interoperability
    New Measures Increase Focus On Semantic Interoperability

    National healthcare movements demand an interoperable framework for accurate data exchange across healthcare continuums. As value-based care continues to unfold, the industry at large remains focused on efforts to mature interoperability to support high-level quality initiatives aimed at improving population health and cutting costs.

  • Four Reasons Healthcare Organizations Need To Simplify The Documentation Of The Clinician Diagnosis Process
    Four Reasons Healthcare Organizations Need To Simplify The Documentation Of The Clinician Diagnosis Process

    Finding and selecting the right diagnosis code is critical to both patient care and revenue cycle management. The downstream negative impact of using an unspecified code can touch everything from decision support to reimbursement, compliance, and reporting. In addition, unspecified codes are not as useful for other clinicians needing to review the records and for patients themselves as they review their own records.

  • CMS Audits Raise The Bar On Patient Communication
    CMS Audits Raise The Bar On Patient Communication

    Two converging trends are moving patient communication strategies front and center for today’s payers: Consumers are demanding greater control of their healthcare decisions; and regulatory movements are requiring better patient experiences.

  • Unspecified Codes: Know Your Financial Exposure
    Unspecified Codes: Know Your Financial Exposure

    On October 1, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) wrapped up its one-year grace period for allowing the use of unspecified codes without consequence. The governing body also rolled out its first update to the coding system in four years, including a mammoth 6,000 new codes.

  • New MACRA Measures Sharpen Focus On Semantic Interoperability
    New MACRA Measures Sharpen Focus On Semantic Interoperability

    Healthcare’s interoperability quest continues to mature, moving the industry closer to semantic interoperability—the highest level of information exchange as defined by the Health Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). ONC’s recent identification of two metrics to support specific indicators of “widespread interoperability” demonstrate this movement.

  • The Importance Of Standardized Healthcare Terminology
    The Importance Of Standardized Healthcare Terminology

    In our previous blog, we discussed the importance of leveraging administrative data for better quality assessment. As the wrap-up to this standards blog series, I want to look back at Crossing the Quality Chasm as a foundational work for improving the quality of healthcare delivery. This paper called not only for better quality but also for a reduction in the cost of that care--this at a time when the population is aging, technology is evolving, and research is rapidly expanding evidenced-based medicine. At least eight of the 13 recommendations made by the authors of Crossing the Quality Chasm directly involve the collection, aggregation, and actionable use of healthcare data.

  • FHIR: An Evolving Opportunity
    FHIR: An Evolving Opportunity

    Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR®) from Health Level Seven (HL7) is making waves across the healthcare industry. In fact, EHR vendors including Cerner, Epic and Meditech are quickly embracing the next-generation framework for its potential to advance data mobility and interoperability.

  • Steps To Successful Analytics
    Steps To Successful Analytics

    In October, hospitals’ fledgling ICD-10 systems and processes will be put to their first major test with the addition of more than 6,130 new codes.

  • Hierarchical Condition Categories Part 1: What’s All The Buzz About?
    Hierarchical Condition Categories Part 1: What’s All The Buzz About?

    There is quite a bit of discussion around Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs) these days. And for good reason: as the risk adjustment model used since 2004 to determine reimbursement for various Medicare plans, the HCC framework is progressively being applied to numerous healthcare reform initiatives. In this two-part series, we break down the basics of HCCs, why they matter and how all healthcare stakeholders should respond to them going forward.

  • How To Use Standardized Healthcare Terminologies To Meet Your Quality Care Goals
    How To Use Standardized Healthcare Terminologies To Meet Your Quality Care Goals

    In the seminal work Crossing the Quality Chasm, published by the Institute of Medicine in 2001, there was a clear call to action for the U.S. healthcare system. This work has driven much of what we are seeing in healthcare information management today. Crossing the Quality Chasm called for healthcare to be safe, effective, patient centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. The argument was made that the adoption of information technology is critical to meeting these goals. I would agree.

  • Medical Billing And Coding:  Exciting Changes Ahead
    Medical Billing And Coding: Exciting Changes Ahead

    It’s an interesting time to be in healthcare, especially medical billing and coding! Over the next few years we will see major changes that will help us spend our healthcare dollars more wisely, and keep people healthier. These changes will have a profound impact on patients’ and physicians’ daily lives. Let’s take a look at some of the biggest changes...

  • SNOMED CT: Why It Matters To You
    SNOMED CT: Why It Matters To You

    By now, most healthcare organizations recognize the challenges associated with aggregating and sharing clinical information. It’s no secret that disparate health IT systems and clinical vocabularies create barriers to exchanging and using patient data in a meaningful way.

  • Terminology Requirements For Meaningful Use, Stages 1 Through 3
    Terminology Requirements For Meaningful Use, Stages 1 Through 3

    This chart outlines electronic health record (EHR) requirements in the Meaningful Use program that necessitate consideration for healthcare terminologies. Although the Meaningful Use program is near its end, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will continue to strengthen requirements for documenting, standardizing and sharing data within, and amongst, EHRs through other programs such as Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) payments, the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), Alternative Payment Models (APMs) – including accountable care programs – and others.

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Health Language

4600 South Syracuse Street

Denver, CO 80237

UNITED STATES

Phone: 720.940.2901

Fax: 720.940.2913

Contact: Josh Johnson

PRODUCTS / SOLUTIONS

  • Language Engine
    Language Engine

    An Ever-Changing Landscape Requires an Evolving Platform. Health Language offers the only comprehensive Enterprise Terminology Management platform of software, content, and consulting...

  • Content Standardization

    Content Standardization enables the creation of a single, integrated, and trusted source of terminology truth across an enterprise.

  • Data Normalization

    Health Language harmonizes data from disparate sources into standard terminologies.

  • Provider Friendly Terminology

    Simplify problem and diagnoses search by supporting the documentation requirements for Meaningful Use and ICD-10 using the language clinician’s use.